Title

Results of total shoulder arthroplasty in patients aged 55 years or younger versus those older than 55 years: an analysis of 1135 patients with over 2 years of follow-up.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2019

Publication Title

Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The results of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) in younger patients have not been clearly elucidated. The purpose of this study was to compare early outcomes after TSA in patients aged 55 years or younger versus patients older than 55 years.

METHODS: A total of 1135 patients who were treated with TSA for glenohumeral arthritis and had a mean follow-up period of over 4 years were retrospectively reviewed. Etiologies included osteoarthritis (n = 1044), osteonecrosis (n = 35), inflammatory arthritis (n = 34), and post-traumatic arthritis (n = 22). Validated outcome measures, range of motion, and patient satisfaction were recorded. Preoperative and postoperative metrics were compared, and a multivariate analysis was performed to isolate age from sex, body mass index, previous surgery, and diagnosis as independent factors.

RESULTS: Female patients, patients with a history of surgery, and patients with a diagnosis of osteonecrosis were more likely to undergo TSA when aged 55 years or younger. Both age groups showed similar preoperative range of motion and showed no differences in recorded outcome scores. Postoperatively, patients older than 55 years had slightly greater active abduction (P = .004) and internal rotation (P = .030). A higher percentage of patients older than 55 years rated their outcome as better or much better compared with those aged 55 years or younger (P = .003).

CONCLUSIONS: Female sex, a history of surgery, and a diagnosis of osteonecrosis were associated with undergoing TSA when aged 55 years or younger. Despite similar preoperative function and minor differences in postoperative range of motion and outcome scores, patients aged 55 years or younger reported lower overall satisfaction with their TSA.

PubMed ID

30591214

Volume

28

Issue

5

First Page

861

Last Page

868

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