Title

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer, Stem Cells, and African Ancestry.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2018

Publication Title

The American journal of pathology

Abstract

Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are more common among African-ancestry populations, such as African Americans and western, sub-Saharan Africans, compared with European-ancestry populations. This phenotype prevalence contributes to disparities in breast cancer outcomes between African Americans and White Americans. Breast cancer stem cells represent the tumor subpopulation involved in metastatic virulence, and ongoing research seeks to characterize the extent to which TNBC versus non-TNBC stem cells may differ. This review summarizes the existing literature regarding TNBCs and stem cells as they pertain to the burden of breast cancer among African-ancestry populations. Additional research related to variations in somatic tumor genomics between the African-American and White-American populations is also summarized. This review furthermore explores the history of insights regarding breast cancer disparities related to racial/ethnic identity, socioeconomic status, and tumor biology.

Medical Subject Headings

African Americans; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Health Status Disparities; Humans; Neoplastic Stem Cells; Social Class; Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms

PubMed ID

29137951

Volume

188

Issue

2

First Page

271

Last Page

279

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