Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1-2021

Publication Title

Surg Obes Relat Dis

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Existing research demonstrates that parity is associated with risk for obesity. The majority of those who undergo bariatric surgery are women, yet little is known about whether having children before bariatric surgery is associated with pre- and postsurgical weight outcomes.

OBJECTIVES: We aim to evaluate presurgical body mass index (BMI) and postsurgical weight loss among a racially diverse sample of women with and without children.

SETTING: Metropolitan hospital system.

METHODS: Women (n = 246) who underwent bariatric surgery were included in this study. Participants self-reported their number of children. Presurgical BMI and postsurgical weight outcomes at 1 year, including change in BMI (ΔBMI), percentage excess weight loss (%EWL), and percentage total weight loss (%TWL) were calculated from measured height and weight.

RESULTS: Those with children had a lower presurgical BMI (P = .01) and had a smaller ΔBMI (P = .01) at 1 year after surgery than those without children, although %EWL and %TWL at 1 year did not differ by child status or number of children. After controlling for age, race, and surgery type, the number of children a woman had was related to smaller ΔBMI at 1 year post surgery (P = .01).

CONCLUSIONS: Although women with children had lower reductions in BMI than those without children, both women with and without children achieved successful postsurgical weight loss. Providers should assess for number of children and be cautious not to deter women with children from having bariatric surgery.

Medical Subject Headings

Bariatric Surgery; Body Mass Index; Child; Female; Humans; Male; Obesity, Morbid; Retrospective Studies; Treatment Outcome; Weight Loss

PubMed ID

33814316

Volume

17

Issue

6

First Page

1127

Last Page

1131

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