Title

Professional interpersonal dynamics and burnout in European transplant surgeons.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-1-2017

Publication Title

Clinical transplantation

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Burnout within the health professions has become an increasingly important topic. Evidence suggests there are differences in burnout across different countries. Research has yet to examine burnout in transplant surgeons throughout Europe.

METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of transplant surgeons across Europe. Survey included sociodemographics, professional characteristics, frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions (PI), decisional autonomy, psychological job demands (PJD), support (coworker, supervisor, and hospital administration), and burnout including emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA).

RESULTS: One hundred and eight transplant surgeons provided data; 33 (30.6%) reported high EE, 19 (17.6%) reported high DP, and 29 (26.9%) reported low PA. Three hierarchical multiple linear regressions examined the burnout subscales as outcomes (EE, DP, and PA), and predictors selected based upon theoretical relationships with the outcomes. Greater PJD, greater discomfort in managing difficult PI, and lower levels of perceived supervisor support (SS) predicted greater EE. Only decisional autonomy significantly predicted DP, accounting for a small proportion of the variance. None of the steps for PA were significant.

CONCLUSIONS: Given prior research on burnout, there were several surprising findings from this study. For example, the relatively low levels of EE compared to U.S. physicians and surgeons. At this time, we can only hypothesize why this finding occurred but there are multiple possible explanations including cultural effects, response bias, or other factors unknown at this time. Research is needed to attempt to clarify these findings.

Medical Subject Headings

Adult; Aged; Burnout, Professional; Cross-Sectional Studies; Europe; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Interpersonal Relations; Male; Middle Aged; Organ Transplantation; Surgeons; Surveys and Questionnaires

PubMed ID

28185307

ePublication

ePub ahead of print

Volume

31

Issue

4

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