Document Type

Article

Publication Date

8-21-2021

Publication Title

Journal of cardiac failure

Abstract

BACKGROUND: It remains unclear whether there is a racial disparity in the response to angiotensin inhibitors in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and whether the role of genomic ancestry plays a part. Therefore, we compared survival rates associated with angiotensin inhibitors in patients with HFrEF by self-identified race and proportion of West African genomic ancestry.

METHODS: Three datasets totaling 1153 and 1480 self-identified Black and White patients, respectively, with HFrEF were meta-analyzed (random effects model) for race-based analyses. One dataset had genomic data for ancestry analyses (416 and 369 self-identified Black and White patients, respectively). Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for propensity scores, assessed the association of angiotensin inhibitor exposure with all-cause mortality by self-identified race or proportion of West African genomic ancestry.

RESULTS: In meta-analysis of self-identified race, adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) for exposure to angiotensin inhibitors were similar in self-identified Black and White patients with HFrEF: 0.52 (0.31-0.85) P = 0.006 and 0.54 (0.42-0.71) P = 0.001, respectively. Results were similar when the proportion of West African genomic ancestry was > 80% or < 5%: 0.66 (0.34-1.25) P = 0.200 and 0.56 (0.26-1.23) P = 0.147, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Among self-identified Black and White patients with HFrEF, reduction in all-cause mortality associated with exposure to angiotensin inhibitors was similar regardless of self-identified race or proportion of West African genomic ancestry.

PubMed ID

34425222

ePublication

ePub ahead of print

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