Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-2021

Publication Title

Circ Cardiovasc Interv

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Women have a higher rate of adverse events after mitral valve surgery. We sought to evaluate whether outcomes after transcatheter edge-to-edge repair intervention by sex have similar trends to mitral valve surgery.

METHODS: The primary outcome was 1-year major adverse events defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, stroke, and any bleeding in the overall study cohort. Patients who underwent transcatheter edge-to-edge repair for mitral regurgitation with the MitraClip system in the Society of Thoracic Surgery/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy registry were evaluated. Linked administrative claims from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were used to evaluate 1-year clinical outcomes. Associations between sex and outcomes were evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression model for in-hospital outcomes and Cox model for 1-year outcomes.

RESULTS: From November 2013 to March 2017, 5295 patients, 47.6% (n=2523) of whom were female, underwent transcatheter edge-to-edge repair. Females were less likely to have >1 clip implanted (P<0.001) and had a lower adjusted odds ratio of device success (adjusted odds ratio, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.67-0.90]), driven by lower odds of residual mitral gradient <5 mm Hg (adjusted odds ratio, 0.54 [CI, 0.46-0.63]) when compared with males. At 1-year follow-up, the primary outcome did not differ by sex. Female sex was associated with lower adjusted 1-year risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.80 [CI, 0.68-0.94]), but the adjusted 1-year risk of stroke and any bleeding did not differ by sex.

CONCLUSIONS: No difference in composite outcome of all-cause mortality, stroke, and any bleeding was observed between females and males. Adjusted 1-year all-cause mortality was lower in females compared with males.

Medical Subject Headings

Aged; Female; Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation; Humans; Male; Medicare; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Registries; Treatment Outcome; United States

PubMed ID

34784236

Volume

14

Issue

11

First Page

009374

Last Page

009374

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