Title

Efficacy and Safety of Crisaborole Ointment, 2%, for the Treatment of Mild-to-Moderate Atopic Dermatitis Across Racial and Ethnic Groups.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2019

Publication Title

American journal of clinical dermatology

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis is highly prevalent in black/African American, Asian, and Hispanic patients, making assessment of these populations in clinical trials important. Crisaborole ointment, 2%, is a nonsteroidal phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor for the treatment of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis. In two pivotal phase III clinical trials in patients aged ≥ 2 years, crisaborole was superior to vehicle in reducing global disease severity. The most common treatment-related adverse event was application site pain.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of crisaborole according to patient race and ethnicity.

METHODS: A pooled post hoc analysis by race and ethnicity of the two pivotal trials and a safety extension trial was performed. Race included white or nonwhite (encompassing Asian/native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander, black/African American, and other/American Indian/Alaskan native); ethnicity included Hispanic/Latino or not Hispanic/Latino.

RESULTS: In white, nonwhite, Hispanic/Latino, and not Hispanic/Latino groups at day 29, more crisaborole- than vehicle-treated patients achieved improvements in global disease severity [Investigator's Static Global Assessment of clear/almost clear with a ≥ 2-grade improvement (white: 33.5% vs. 22.3%, nominal p < 0.001; nonwhite: 30.0% vs. 21.3%, nominal p < 0.05; Hispanic/Latino: 35.4% vs. 18.2%, nominal p < 0.01; not Hispanic/Latino: 31.3% vs. 22.8%, nominal p < 0.01)]. Crisaborole treatment also improved atopic dermatitis signs/symptoms and quality of life. Frequency of crisaborole-related adverse events was 7.1-8.5% in the pivotal trials.

CONCLUSION: Across races and ethnicities, crisaborole demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis, with a low frequency of treatment-related adverse events.

PubMed ID

31264114

ePublication

ePub ahead of print

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