Title

ASYMPTOMATIC PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM EXISTS IN NORTH INDIA: RETROSPECTIVE DATA FROM 2 TERTIARY CARE CENTERS

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1-2015

Publication Title

Endocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) has evolved into an asymptomatic disease in the west. In contrast, classic symptoms of PHPT have been reported to be common in the east. Here we describe clinical and biochemical profiles of patients diagnosed with PHPT between 2009 and 2012.METHODS: This was a retrospective study conducted at 2 tertiary care centers in north India. All patients who underwent evaluation and surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) from January 2009 to December 2012 were included.RESULTS: A total of 50 patients were studied between 2009 and 2012. Among them 31 (62%) were symptomatic and 19 (38%) were asymptomatic. The mean age (SD) was 48.3 (15.8) years, and the female to male ratio was 1.9:1. None of the patients had brown tumors or bone deformities. The asymptomatic group had significantly lower median adenoma weight (0.57 vs. 3.4 g, P<.05), a higher mean age (57.3 vs. 42.8 years, P<.05), and a lower median intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level (254.5 vs. 295 pg/mL, P<.05) compared to the symptomatic group. Adenoma weight was positively correlated with baseline serum calcium, iPTH, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels.CONCLUSION: The asymptomatic form of PHPT was found in a significant percentage of north Indian patients in this study. Asymptomatic PHPT patients were older in age and had lower parathyroid adenoma weights and iPTH levels compared to symptomatic PHPT patients. Positive correlations were found between parathyroid adenoma weight and serum calcium, iPTH, and ALP levels.

PubMed ID

25667372

Volume

21

Issue

6

First Page

581

Last Page

585

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