Title

Specialist Endoscopists Are Associated with a Decreased Risk of Incomplete Polyp Resection During Endoscopic Mucosal Resection in the Colon.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2017

Publication Title

Digestive diseases and sciences

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Endoscopic experience is known to correlate with outcomes of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), particularly complete resection of the polyp tissue. Whether specialist endoscopists can protect against incomplete polypectomy in the setting of known risk factors for incomplete resection (IR) is unknown.

AIMS: We aimed to characterize how specialist endoscopists may help to mitigate the risk of IR of large sessile polyps.

METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent EMR at the University of Michigan from January 1, 2006, to November 15, 2015. The primary outcome was endoscopist-reported polyp tissue remaining at the end of the initial EMR attempt. Specialist endoscopists were defined as endoscopists who receive tertiary referrals for difficult colonoscopy cases and completed at least 20 EMR colonic polyp resections over the study period.

RESULTS: A total of 257 patients with 269 polyps were included in the study. IR occurred in 40 (16%) cases. IR was associated with polyp size ≥ 40 mm [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-7.93], flat/laterally spreading polyps (aOR 2.61, 95% CI 1.24-5.48), and difficulty lifting the polyp (aOR 11.0, 95% CI 2.66-45.3). A specialist endoscopist performing the initial EMR was protective against IR, even in the setting of risk factors for IR (aOR 0.13, 95% CI 0.04-0.41).

CONCLUSIONS: IR is associated with polyp size ≥ 40 mm, flat and/or laterally spreading polyps, and difficulty lifting the polyp. A specialist endoscopist initiating the EMR was protective of IR.

Medical Subject Headings

Aged; Cohort Studies; Colonic Polyps; Endoscopic Mucosal Resection; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Specialization

PubMed ID

28600656

Volume

62

Issue

9

First Page

2464

Last Page

2471

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