Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-1-2022

Publication Title

American journal of physiology. Renal physiology

Abstract

Obesity increases the risk of renal damage, but the mechanisms are not clear. Normally, kidneys autoregulate to keep the glomerular capillary pressure (P(GC)), renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate in a steady state. However, in obesity, higher P(GC), renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate are noted. Together, these may lead to glomerular damage. P(GC) is controlled mainly by afferent arteriole resistance, which, in turn, is regulated by tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), a vasoconstrictor mechanism. High fat-induced obesity causes renal damage, and this may be related to increased P(GC). However, there are no studies as to whether high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity affects TGF. We hypothesized that TGF would be attenuated in obesity caused by HFD feeding (60% fat) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a normal-fat diet (NFD; 12% fat) served as the control. We studied 4 and 16 wk of HFD feeding using in vivo renal micropuncture of individual rat nephrons. We did not observe significant differences in body weight, TGF response, and mean arterial pressure at 4 wk of HFD feeding, but after 16 wk of HFD, rats were heavier and hypertensive. The maximal TGF response was smaller in HFD-fed rats than in NFD-fed rats, indicating an attenuation of TGF in HFD-induced obesity. Baseline P(GC) was higher in HFD-fed rats than in NFD-fed rats and was associated with higher glomerulosclerosis. We conclude that attenuated TGF and higher P(GC) along with hypertension in HFD-fed obese Sprague-Dawley rats could explain the higher propensity of glomerular damage observed in obesity.

NEW & NOTEWORTHY Reduced tubuloglomerular feedback, higher glomerular capillary pressure, and hypertension in combination may explain the higher glomerular damage observed in high-fat diet-induced obesity.

Medical Subject Headings

Animals; Diet, High-Fat; Feedback; Female; Humans; Hypertension; Kidney Diseases; Male; Obesity; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley

PubMed ID

35224993

Volume

322

Issue

4

First Page

429

Last Page

429

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