Title

ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BASELINE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK AND SLEEP DURATION IN AMBULATORY US ADULTS: INSIGHTS FROM THE NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Date

5-1-2021

Publication Title

Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Abstract

Background: Baseline CV risk may partially explain the significant variability in sleep duration across a population. We evaluated the association between baseline CV risk and self-reported sleep duration.

Methods: We used data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2010 and linked cause of death from National Center for Health Statistics for adults aged ≥18 years. The 10-year atherosclerotic CV disease risk score (ASCVD) was used to assess baseline CV risk and self-reported sleep duration was the outcome. We excluded participants with prevalent CV disease, defined as self-reported coronary artery disease, heart failure or stroke. Continuous variables were represented as medians with interquartile range (IQR). Non-linearity was accounted for using restricted cubic spline models.

Results: There were 14,079 eligible participants. Mean age was 46±19 years with 52% women and 46% non-Hispanic Whites. The median 10-year ASCVD risk was 3.5% (0.5, 14.4). There was a U-shaped relationship with 10-year ASCVD risk score and the sleep duration such that participants with a sleep-duration of 6-7 hours had the lowest risk (P-trend<0.001, Figure). The median 10-year ASCVD risk among participants with <6, 6-7 and >7 hours of sleep were 4.6% (0.9, 15.7), 3.3% (0.6, 12.3) and 3.3% (0.4, 17.3), respectively.

Conclusion: Least 10-year ASCVD risk is associated with a self-reported sleep duration of 6-7 hours in ambulatory US adults without prevalent CV disease.

Volume

77

Issue

18

First Page

10

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