Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-1-2021

Publication Title

Cardiorenal Med

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary hypertension is common among patients with end-stage renal disease, although data regarding the impact of right ventricular (RV) failure on postoperative outcomes remain limited. We hypothesized that echocardiographic findings of RV dilation and dysfunction are associated with adverse clinical outcomes after renal transplant.

METHODS: A retrospective review of adult renal transplant recipients at a single institution from January 2008 to June 2010 was conducted. Patients with transthoracic echocardiograms (TTEs) within 1 year leading up to transplant were included. The primary end point was a composite of delayed graft function, graft failure, and all-cause mortality.

RESULTS: Eighty patients were included. Mean follow-up time was 9.4 ± 0.8 years. Eight patients (100%) with qualitative RV dysfunction met the primary end point, while 39/65 patients (60.0%) without RV dysfunction met the end point (p = 0.026). Qualitative RV dilation was associated with a significantly shorter time to all-cause graft failure (p = 0.03) and death (p = 0.048). RV systolic pressure was not measurable in 45/80 patients (56%) and was not associated with outcomes in the remaining patients.

CONCLUSION: RV dilation and dysfunction are associated with adverse outcomes after renal transplant. TTE assessment of RV size and function should be a standard part of the pre-kidney transplant cardiovascular risk assessment.

PubMed ID

33853060

Volume

11

Issue

2

First Page

109

Last Page

118

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