Title

Emotional distress among survivors of Adolescent and Young Adult cancer or adult cancer

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-8-2022

Publication Title

Annals of epidemiology

Abstract

PURPOSE: We examined emotional distress in cancer survivors diagnosed as adolescents or young adults (AYAs) vs. cancer survivors diagnosed as middle/older adults and vs. the general population without a history of cancer.

METHODS: Using the 2014-2017 National Health Interview Surveys, 2,500 AYA survivors (initial cancer diagnosed between aged 15-39 years) were matched with 2,500 middle/older adult survivors (initial cancer diagnosed at aged ≥40 years) as well as with 1,609 from the general population without a history of cancer. Multinomial logistic regression models estimated the risk of emotional distress (measured using the validated Kessler distress (K6) scale) in the study population (AYA vs. middle/older adult cancer survivors and vs. general population without cancer), adjusting for known covariates.

RESULTS: Emotional distress was more prevalent among AYAs (average age 52.8 ± 19.1 years) than middle/older adult (average age 67.4 ± 14.0 years) cancer survivors (moderate: 25.5% vs. 19.4%; and severe: 6.4% vs. 4.4% [P<.0001]); however, there was no difference in emotional distress between AYA cancer survivors (moderate: 26.8% and severe: 7.5%) vs. general population without cancer (moderate: 23.7% and severe: 6.2%). In the multivariable multinomial analyses, AYA cancer survivors had higher risk of reporting emotional distress (aRR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.13, 1.86) than middle/older adult cancer survivors.

CONCLUSION: Psychosocial support may be especially needed for cancer survivors diagnosed as adolescents or young adults to mitigate adverse psychosocial outcomes.

PubMed ID

35405345

ePublication

ePub ahead of print

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