Title

Factor for felons: how can we provide haemophilia care to the incarcerated?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-2015

Publication Title

Haemophilia : the official journal of the World Federation of Hemophilia

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In 2011, 6.98-million offenders were documented in the adult correctional system, with state operating costs designated 12% towards medical care ($11.97 day per inmate) for the general population. Common co-existing health problems identified are: arthritis (13%), hypertension (11%), asthma (10%) and heart problems (6%). Less than 5% of inmates have health issues related to cancer, diabetes, liver or renal problems and communicable diseases. The leading cause of death is suicide (33.2%), followed by heart disease (26.1%). Despite these statistics quality is lacking. Given these statistics, one would expect that a small proportion of patients from Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC) will spend some time within the justice system. Currently there are no data addressing haemophilia care needs while incarcerated.

METHODS: This article will review the current health care issues in the adult correctional system. Additionally, six case reports of incarcerated haemophiliacs will be highlighted exploring the successes and challenges with maintaining haemophilia care addressing the priority of meeting the haemophilia care needs verses the penal system regulations.

SUMMARY: It can be expected that at some point, the HTC will experience a patient incarcerated for some period of time. The HTC will continue to advocate for their patient within this system, despite the many challenges faced.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite the challenges outlined, ongoing communication and education with the correctional system, education of the medical personnel and prison personnel remains the priority as we advocate for our patients. Continued strategies in these areas are paramount.

Medical Subject Headings

Adult; Factor VIII; Health Personnel; Hemophilia A; Humans; Middle Aged; Patient Advocacy; Patient Care; Prisons; Young Adult

PubMed ID

26178271

Volume

21

Issue

6

First Page

772

Last Page

777

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