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Henry Ford Hospital Medical Journal

Abstract

This report is a comparison of patients presenting with 1) an insomnia complaint diagnosed as no objective findings. 2) insomnia diagnosed as being associated with a psychiatric disorder, and 3) daytime sleepiness diagnosed as no objective findings. The sleep of patients with insomnia diagnosed as no objective findings is comparable to that of patients with daytime sleepiness diagnosed as no objective findings and is significantly better than that of patients with insomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder. Significant differences were found in sleep induction, sleep maintenance, and overall sleep efficiency. No major differences were found among any of the groups in terms of sleep staging. All groups showed signs of psychological distress, but as expected this was significantly higher in the patients with insomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder. The fact that patients may present with sleep complaints (either insomnia or daytime somnolence) despite essentially normal sleep has clinical implications. Adequate evaluation of sleep complaints and symptomatic treatment plans are discussed.

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